Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend Global Food Security and Sustainability Conference Beijing,China.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Huada Daniel Ruan

Beijing Normal University-Hong Kong Baptist University, China

Keynote: Health Risk from Heavy Metal and Pesticide Residue via Consumption of Food Crop in Huitong, Zhuhai, China

Time : 10:00 - 10:35

OMICS International Food Security 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Huada Daniel Ruan photo
Biography:

Huada Daniel Ruan, Dual PhD, Professor and Founding Head of the Department of Environmental Science, Beijing Normal University-Hong Kong Baptist University United International College (UIC). Prof. Ruan earned his first PhD in Mineralogy from The University of Western Australia, and second PhD in Chemistry from Queensland University of Technology. He has a background in chemistry, earth sciences, environmental science, and biological science with more than 25 years of experience in teaching and research in Australia, the U.S., Mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau, and published more than 110 articles. Prof. Ruan is the pioneer researcher established non-point water pollution index in Australia, found and confirmed that 0.02 ppm of phosphorus is the critical value of water eutrophication. His research achievement also include mineral chemistry at Queensland University of Technology, Australia that contributed to a significant increase (2-5%) in the extraction of alumina from bauxite; the bio-chemical remediation of contaminated soils at Purdue University U.S.A. had contributed to the stabilization of heavy metals Cr and Pb biologically and chemically; participation in air pollution monitoring, indoor air quality, food safety and labeling, electronic waste treatment and certification in Hong Kong. He has been invited to be the Adjunct Professor, Griffith University, Australia, Visiting Professor, South China Agricultural University, Visiting Research Professor, Research Institute of Ecology and Soil Science, Guangdong Academy of Science, Honorary Consultant, Hong Kong Institute of Environmentalist, Vice Chairman of the Environmental Subcommittee, Hong Kong Association of Testing, Inspection and Certification, Jury Member of Court, Queensland, Australia, Zhuhai City Committee Member of Emergency Management. He is a Certified Auditor of ISO9001 and ISO14001, editor/reviewer of a number of international journals and an active member of a number of international professional associations.

Abstract:

Vegetables can absorb not only nutrients but also pollutants such as heavy metals from the soil. This is commonly accompanied with high input of fertilizers and agrochemicals during the period of growth. In the first part of this experiment, 16 vegetable samples were collected from four representative areas in Huitong, Zhuhai City to detect pesticide residues using enzyme inhibition assay. The results showed that about 50% of vegetable samples were contaminated by pesticides, with 75% of them being leafy vegetables. The vegetables investigated have shown potential to bioaccumulate pesticides in their tissues. As a result, neurological health impacts are concerned for a long-term exposure to pesticides. In the second part of the experiment, the above 16 vegetable and four soil samples were collected and analysed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The results revealed that no soil samples exceeded the maximum residue levels (MRLs) of copper, zinc, cadmium, manganese, nickel, chromium and lead compared to those of the China National Standard (GB 1516-1995). However, based on the Nemerow pollution index, about 88% of vegetable samples were contaminated with various amounts of heavy metals. According to the China National Standard (GB 18406.1.2001), cadmium in Zay mays (0.13 mg/kg, Spot B; 0.073 mg/kg, Spot C) and Lactuca sativa L (0.066 mg/kg, Spot B) exceeded about 2.6, 1.5 and 1.3 times of MRLs (0.05 mg/kg), respectively. Moreover, lead in Zea mays (1.72 mg/kg, spot B; 1.57 mg/kg, spot C) from two sampling spots, exceeded about 8 times of MRLs (0.20 mg/kg). It is notice that vegetable has shown a great potential for bioaccumulation of heavy metals from the soil. Thus, such bioaccumulation can be explained by the plant and soil factors that affect the uptake of heavy metals by vegetables.

Break: 10:35 - 10:50 coffee [email protected] Foyer
  • Work shop on Innovations in food processing and preservation techniques
Location: Gingko tree room

Session Introduction

Gamal Fouad Mohamed

National Research Centre, Egypt

Title: Innovations in food processing and preservation techniques

Time : 10:50 - 11:50

Speaker
Biography:

Gamal Fouad Mohamed has completed his PhD in Food Science in 1997. He is a member in several projects and Lecturer in Training Courses for evaluation of food quality assurance. He won three prizes for the best scientific research and published 36 research papers in international journals in the field of Food Science and Technology.

Abstract:

Food preservation is through common preservation techniques such as salting, drying, canning, smoking and other. Where, the main problem with the thermal processing method is loss of colour, flavor, vitamins and other nutrients in food products. The food industry is currently interested to use some of novel production and processing technologies that may result in economical and improved quality products. Innovation in food technology goes in parallel with consumer demand for healthy food and safer while improving the quality and shelf life. Novel technologies like microwave heating, the new techniques such as high-pressure processing (HPP), innovations to packaging materials (Active packaging techniques extend the possibility of keeping food quality at its best during storage), and use of preservatives (chemical additives) in food has expanded a great deal in recent years, such as natural anti -microbial preservatives and antioxidants). Also, some of the future methods of food preservation are irradiation, although, these methods are currently in use, they are expected to expand and develop further. The development of novel nano-technological tools and other bioactive ingredients will also contribute to the development of value added food products.

  • Science, Sociology and Economics
    Environment Changes and Food Security in China
    Hybridization and its Effects
    Urbanization and Food Value Chains
    Trade Liberalization
    Genetically Modified Crops
Location: Gingko tree room

Chair

Gamal Fouad Mohamed

National Research Centre, Egypt

Co-Chair

Francesca Hansstein

Shanghai University of Finance and Economics, China

Session Introduction

Samuel Marfo

University for Development Studies

Title: Conflict and food insecurity: An introspection of bumkpurugu-yooyun district in northern Gana

Time : 11:50 - 12:25

Speaker
Biography:

Samuel Marfo  is currently work as professor at Department of Social, Political and Historical Studies,University for Development Studies, Faculty of Integrated Development Studies.

Abstract:

Food insecurity has been a major problem confronting developing nations including Ghana as it results in considerable health, social and psychological consequences, which invariably undermines human security. This study sought to explore how intra-ethnic conflicts affect household food sufficiency in the Bumkpurugu-Yunyoo District in the Northern Region of Ghana, which in contemporary times has witnessed occasional destructive conflicts notably between the Konkombas and the Bimobas. Given the objective of the study, both purposive and random sampling techniques were used in selecting 107 respondents from four conflict prone communities namely Bimbagu, Jimbale, Kpamale and Nyankpanduri. Data gathered through semi-structured interview between June, 2015 and December, 2015 in an exploratory study revealed that food insecurity in the study locality has been partly facilitated by the burning of farms and food stock, food thefts, and insecurity and induced migration which result in low economic activities. This paper therefore advocates for continuous dialogue, swift intervention into conflict situations by the justice system, as well as periodic education and training of traditional and opinion leaders in conflict detection and management as a way of managing disagreements among the various (ethnic) groups in the study locality without the recourse to violence. 

Speaker
Biography:

Marlina has completed her PhD at the age of 45 years from Universiti Putra Malaysia. She is the Professor on Microbiology in Faculty of Pharmacy, Andalas University. She also interest to research about Vaccine, especially for Human Papilloma Virus and stem cell medicine, especially for osteoarthritis disease.

Abstract:

Vibrio parahaemolyticus was identified from shrimp (Penaeus monodon), white shrimp (Penaeus merguensis), “kelong” shrimp (Penaeus indicus). The bacteria were recovered using chromagenic Vibrio agar. Isolated V. parahaemolyticus was further characterized by plasmid profiling. The virulence genes of the isolates (toxR, tdh, trh) that produce pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus were screened by PCR assay. The plasmid profiling analysis showed that out of 20 isolates, only 5 isolates contained plasmids. Specific PCR showed that 120 (100%) of the isolates carried toxR gene, 6 (9.7%) isolates possessed trh genes, only 1 (1.6%) have tdh gene.

Break: 13:00 - 14:00 Lunch @ Easy Kitchen Restaurant

Rameshwar Singh Pande

Samarth- Nepal Market Development Programme, Nepal

Title: Negative supply of quality fodder- A threat for competitive dairy market growth: A critical assessment

Time : 14:00 - 14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Rameshwar Singh Pande is a National Professional in the field of Livestock, Pasture, Fodder and Rangeland in Nepal. He has completed his Master’s degree from Massey University, New Zealand in 1990 and possess a sound track record under government as well as holding several key positions at international organisation. Presently, he is contributing as a Senior Advisor Forage in Samath-Nepal Market Development Programme. He has published four books on Forage and Pasture Development in Nepal and over 20 recearch/review papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an peer reviewer and technical comittee member of many relevant organisations.

Abstract:

A significant achievement made in commercialized livestock production, however, competitive and sustainable production due to short supply of quality fodder still a challenge. Majority of commercial dairy producers rely on straw with higher doses of grain by-products which are neither healthier nor cost efficient. For the development of sustainable and competitive strategy; updated assessment of feed balance to address the crosscutting issues of dairy sector are important. The assessment reveals the overall demand of feeds is 30.2 m. mt DM and supply is only 18.3 m mt DM. Thus, the deficit of DM is -11.9 m mt DM. The supply of crop residues exceeds the demand by 0.8 m mt DM, but the deficit of green fodder is (-) 10.6 m mt DM. Significant deficit of green fodder seriously affects on health conditions and productivity. Such a negative supply of feed and fodder has compelled the commercialized dairy producers to look for easily available ration i.e. straw and grain by-products. But such conventional feeding practices have resulted into higher feeding cost. Based on this assumption, about 125,000 ha to support dairy producers either agricultural or community land under intensive fodder cultivation is needed. For this, the government and potential international organizations should come forward to address such a crisis for the sustainability and competitive dairy market growth.

Speaker
Biography:

Oladapo A A has completed her Master of Science degree in Nutrition and Dietetics with PhD grade from Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta. She is a Lecturer and Examination Officer in the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Rufus Giwa polytechnic, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria. She is a Registered Dietitian and Member of Association of Dietitians in Nigeria (MADN), Nutrition Society of Nigeria (MNSN) and Women in Technical Education and Employment (MWITED). She has published 10 papers in reputed journals as well as presented nine papers in conferences and workshops.

Abstract:

The study was designed to assess the awareness of the farm settlers in Idanre Local Government Area (LGA) on the impact of climatic variability on food production and food security status. 100 households, whose major occupation was farming, were randomly selected in 4 rural communities of Idanre LGA Ondo State, Nigeria. Semi structured questionnaire was used to obtain information on socio economic characteristics, availability and affordability of some staple foods, coping strategy during food crisis, food security status and awareness on climatic variability. The results showed that 59% were male while 41% were female, majority (93%) of the households reported that some of the staple foods such as cassava were both available and affordable. While result on food consumption pattern showed that 44% of the households consumed cassava more than four times per week and the overall consumption of roots and tuber were high (90%). Food security status of the households using coping strategy index showed that 47% of the household had no/low coping strategy and one quarter (25%) of the households reported that they reduce the number of their meal while 40% purchased food on credit. Awareness of the households on the impact of climatic variability on food production showed that majority (75%) were aware that climatic variability reduces soil nutrients with resultant effect on crops yield. The farm households were aware of the impact of climatic variability on food production but lacked adequate knowledge on adaptation strategy. 

Speaker
Biography:

Hattim Makki has completed his PhD from Institute of Food Technology, University of Agricultural Sciences, Vienna, Austria. Now, he is a Professor in Food Science and Technology and the Head of Food Science and Technology Department, College of Agricultural Studies, Sudan University of Science and Technology. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals. He has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of NFRC Journal of Food Science and Technology.

Abstract:

Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is considered as the top of the nutritional problems especially among children in Sudan or other African countries where sorghum is the main source of energy and protein. Therefore, feterita sorghum as a basic staple food in Sudan and white bean as a protein supplement were selected as basic raw materials for production of drum dried sorghum based-ready-to-serve instant infants food. The results obtained in this study confirmed the great beneficial effects of white beans supplementation on sorghum nutritional value. Addition of white beans flour to feterita sorghum flour at ratios of 30:70 overcame lysine amino acid deficiency in sorghum protein. Also, all the other essential amino acids in sorghum-white beans composite flour were found more abundant than is needed for the different physiological needs for infants or pre-school children as envisaged by the FAO/WHO/UN. Moreover, the net protein value in sorghum native flour increased from 5.7% to 19.0% in sorghum white beans composite flour. Beside, the ratios of the amino acids leucine to isoleucine, leucine to lysine and arginine to lysine were favorably remained below the safety limits that predicted by the FAO to prevent the pellagragenic effects of sorghum protein. On the other hand, the drum dried method used in this study was found suitable for processing Feterita sorghum-white beans composite flour into ready-to-serve instant infants’ food with high nutritional-high energy values and acceptable functional properties.

Break: 15:30 - 15:45 Coffee break @ Foyer

Alice Tirkey

College of Agriculture- IGKV, India

Title: Combining ability analysis for root yield in ashwagandha (Withania somnifera (L.)

Time : 15:45 - 16:15

Speaker
Biography:

Alice Tirkey has completed her PhD in Genetics and Plant Breeding from IGKV, Raipur (C.G), India. She is working as Scientist in College of Agriculture, IGKV, Raipur (C.G), India. She has worked in rice quality, hydrid development, screening of drought in rice crop of safflower and presently working in crop improvement in medicinal and aromatic plants viz. screening of quality and quantitative traits and developing hybrids. She has good publication in all the above said crops in reputed journal and has published more than 15 papers.

Abstract:

Combining ability analysis was carried out for days to 50% flowering, Plant height (cm), No. of primary branches per plant, No. of secondary root per plant, root girth per plant (cm), root length per plant (cm), fresh root yield per plant (g), dry root yield per plant (g), No. of secondary root per plant, No. of berries per plant and biological yield in a systematic set of crosses involving 3 lines and 6 testers. The analysis of variance of combining ability for most character revealed significant variability among parents, cross, Line x Tester, and parents vs. crosses. Among the line RAS-7 was found best combiner for days to 50% flowering, No. of primary branches per plant, root girth per plant (cm), root length per plant (cm), fresh root yield per plant (g) and No. of berries per plant where as, RAS-15 showed best general combiner for plant height (cm) and IGAU-1 for dry root yield per plant (g) and for No. secondary root per plant. Among the tester MWS-310 and Poshita were rate as best general combiner for root yield per plant (g). The cross RAS-7X Poshita and IGAU-1XWS-90-111 recorded significant heterosis for fresh root yield per plant (g) and its contributing traits. The crosses RAS-15XMWS-310 and RAS-7X Poshita recorded significant heterosis for dry root yield per plant (g). This cross may be considered for exploitation for the production of root yield in ashwagandha. This might be due to favourable dominant gene, over dominance or epistataic gene. 

Speaker
Biography:

Christopher R Bryant has completed his Doctorate in 1970 from the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research has been focused on “Peri-urban agriculture and its relationships with cities for almost 50 years, the adaptation of agriculture to climate change and variability (25 years) and local and community development (30 years)” with extensive publications and communications in all three domains. He has been a Professor at the University of Waterloo and the University of Montreal, and is currently Adjunct Professor at the Universities of Montreal and Guelph.

Abstract:

Food security deals with issues of food “quality”, sustainable agricultural practices and accessibility to impoverished urban populations. In many developed countries, many large cities are surrounded by high quality farmland resources in temperate climates (e.g. in North America and Western Europe). A rapidly emerging reality is the differential impact of Climate Change and Variability (CCV) on farming in different areas and the need for appropriate agricultural adaptation to CCV. In many developed countries, appropriate adaptation can maintain food production levels even though crop composition may change. However, in many developing countries (e.g. in North and West Africa) existing climate conditions and CCV can reduce peri-urban areas’ ability to contribute to national and local food security. Two challenges are: Short of reversing CCV, many developing countries will become more dependent upon food imports from developed countries-what does this imply? And; this increases the need to conserve farmland resources in developed countries, a real challenge given continuing urban development pressures. How can agricultural management and planning in such areas integrate food security both locally and internationally and conserve their farmland resources? This is illustrated using a number of pertinent examples from different countries.