Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend Global Food Security and Sustainability Conference Beijing,China.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Gamal Fouad Mohamed

National Research Centre, Egypt

Keynote: Food preservation and safety of irradiation techniques

Time : 10:15 - 10:50

OMICS International Food Security 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Gamal Fouad Mohamed photo
Biography:

Ph. D. in Food Science (1997). Member in several projects (7), International conferences attendance (10), workshops (7), Spain Scientific Missions (6), lecture in training courses (15) for evaluation of food quality assurance, international journals reviewer in the field of food science, Attend a training course (3) in Microbiological Analysis of Food and use of optical scan technology to the computer to assess the quality of food , prize for the best scientific research (3) and Published (36) research papers in international journals in the field of food science and Technology.

Abstract:

Food irradiation is a processing and preservation technique with similar results to freezing or pasteurization. During this procedure, the food is exposed to doses of ionizing energy, or radiation. At low doses, irradiation extends a product’s shelf life. At higher doses, this process kills insects, moulds, bacteria and other potentially harmful micro-organisms. Food irradiation cannot kill viruses. Foods such as fruits, vegetables, spices and meats can be exposed to radiation to kill insects, moulds and micro-organisms. The food is exposed to ionising radiation, either from gamma rays or a high-energy electron beam or powerful x-rays. Gamma rays and x-rays are a form of radiation that shares some characteristics with microwaves, but with much higher energy and penetration. The rays pass through the food just like microwaves in a microwave oven, but the food does not heat up to any significant extent. Exposure to gamma rays does not make food radioactive. There are no detectable levels of radiation left behind in the products. Irradiation causes minimal changes to the chemical composition of the food, however, it can alter the nutrient content of some foods because it reduces the level of some of the B-group vitamins. This loss is similar to those that occur when food is cooked or preserved in more traditional and accepted ways, such as canning or blanching. Some foods, such as dairy foods and eggs, can't be irradiated because it causes changes in flavor or texture.

Keynote Forum

Satya.P.Bindra

UNCSD Rio+20 Focal Point, Libya

Keynote: Sustainable integrated water resources management for energy production and food security in Libya

Time : 10:50 - 11:25

OMICS International Food Security 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Satya.P.Bindra photo
Biography:

Dr Satya Bindra a principal resource person for UNCSD Rio+20 Focal Point Libya & its numerous initiatives served DAAD Fellow Germany & global strategic management institute USA & Professor in India, UK, Germany, Kuwait, Jordan, Iran, Malta and in Libya. He has published over five hundred scientific papers, ten books and numerous research reports. As Professor in Jordan, Iran, Germany, Malta & Libya he developed numerous programs related to UN best practices, food security & setting up crisis and risk management centers. As a consultant for Consultative Council in Malta & Libya he offered capacity development programs for agriculture & project management.

Abstract:

After presenting an overview of sustainable integrated water resources management at global, regional, national and local level for enhanced energy production and food security, paper presents Libya based academies, universities, high institutes technical colleges and Research Centers initiatives to reduce, reuse & recycle resources product and services (3Rs) for rebuilding the country to combat climate change impacts induced by 2011 Libyan crisis. It shows how the country is engaged in preparing actions, accords, ideas and best practices to mitigate the impact of projected extreme events and weather by considering low carbon, resource efficient measures and enhanced use of renewable to tackle impending climate change. 28 hot spots in Libya are identified to convert them to bright spots. An initiative on water-energy-food nexus is established to focus on the interdependence of the three strategic resources by understanding the challenges and finding opportunities. The nexus objectives are 1) To improve energy, water and food security 2) To address externalities across sectors and decision-making at the nexus & 3) To support transitions towards sustainability. To resolve Libyan problem, UNCSD Rio+20 Focal Point has undertaken activities in developing a framework for water security and climate resilience development using IWRM as a Tool in line with UNFCCC guidelines on fresh water resources and climate change adaptation. The objective is to help in not only promotion of a global climate change processes in general and Libya in particular as reflected in intended nationally determined contributions (INDC) presented during UNFCC COP 21 Dec 2015 conference. 

  • Workshop on Challenges & Opportunities of Agtech Distribution in Developing Countries
Location: Gingko tree room

Session Introduction

Manuela Zoninsein

CMO and Cofounder of AgVali, USA

Title: Challenges & Opportunities of Agtech Distribution in Developing Countries

Time : 11:30 - 12:30

Speaker
Biography:

Manuela Zoninsein received her Master of Science from the University of Oxford in Modern Chinese Studies, focusing on China’s pesticide polizie, and her BA from Harvard University in Social Studies, and Latin American Studies. She is the CMO and cofounder of AgVali, a cross-border marketplace platform connecting world-class suppliers of agriculture inputs and equipment with qualified distributors in new markets. She has published hundreds of article in publications globally in English, Mandarin, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Abstract:

There are 1 million agricultural distributors servicing 1.2+ billion farmers globally, but emerging market distributors struggle to keep up with the rapidly modernizing needs of farmers who are working to become more efficient and sustainable, and to identify and access suitable new solutions and supplier relationships. On the other hand, agriculture innovation & investment in developed countries is booming: US$4.2B is expected in early-stage investments for 2015 in the U.S. alone (ahead of fintech or medtech, per AgFunder). Yet these suppliers are struggling to identify or build distributions channels to access buyers in new markets. The AgVali platform enables Retailers to satisfy their farmer-clients’ needs, to learn about new products, and to connect with new suppliers globally. Our platform simultaneously enables Suppliers to consider new markets & viable sales channels, to thereby increase their revenues, valuations, & access to a broader spectrum of customers. We aim to drive the future of farming by connecting the long-tail in agriculture, thereby helping farmers and distributors in emerging markets to purchase the products they need to stay effective and productive; by opening new sales channels needed for innovative and SME suppliers to grow and pick up speed; and by helping emerging market farmers and distributors to create their first digital “footprints” so as to demonstrate their needs globally which in turn can re-orient the agriculture market according to bottom-up, alternative visions of innovation.

Break: Lunch 12:30 - 13:30 @ Easy Kitchen Restaurant
  • Global Food Security
    Aquaculture in Food Security
    Sustainable Food Production Systems
    consumer Behavior and Nutritional Security
    Bio fuels and its Importance
Location: Beijing, China

Chair

Gamal Fouad Mohamed

National Research Centre, Egypt

Co-Chair

Francesca Hansstein

Shanghai University of Finance and Economics, China

Session Introduction

Beatrice Anim AIGHEWI

International Institute of Tropical Agriculture

Title: Progress in enhancing yam productivity in West Africa through sustainable availability of high quality seed

Time : 13:30 - 14:00

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Beatrice Aighewi is an Agronomist and Yam Seed Systems Specialist in the “Yam Improvement for Income and Food Security in West Africa” project of the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria. She completed her PhD in 1998 from the University of Ibadan, Nigeria after an MSc from Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. She has lectured on different aspects of Agronomy at the University of Dschang, Cameroon and University of Abuja, Nigeria. Her research activities and publications are focused on propagation of tropical root and tuber crops.

Abstract:

Yam (Dioscorea spp) is important for household food security and income generation for at least 60 million people in West Africa, a region that produces more than 93% of world yam in 47 million hectares. However, average yield of 12 t/ha is much lower than the potential of 26 t/ha. Among the major constraints in yam production are the shortage of quality seed due to low multiplication ratio, and high prevalence of diseases and pests in field and storage. The BMGF funded “Yam Improvement for Income and Food Security in West Africa (YIIFSWA)” project was set up with a five-year goal to increase yam productivity by 40% for 200,000 small-holder yam farmers in Ghana and Nigeria, as well as deliver technologies to improve the productivity and livelihoods of these farmers. A participatory approach integrating training, demonstrations and study visits is used to encourage smallholder yam farmers to improve the quality of their saved seed. So far, 323 demonstration plots (300 m2) have been established and 54,872 farmers directly trained in production of quality seed. A formal seed yam system was initiated with novel methods of rapidly multiplying yams using the temporary immersion bioreactor and aeroponics systems, developed to produce high quality pre-basic and basic seed. Production of micro-tubers using vine cuttings is being promoted. Sensitive virus indexing tools, procedures to generate virus-free yams and a seed yam quality management protocol were developed to produce quality planting material. This integrated approach will ensure sustainable availability of high quality seed yams.

Ofira Ayalon

University of Haifa and Samuel Neaman Institute, Israel

Title: Lost and found- A preleminary assessment of food waste in Israel

Time : 14:00 - 14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Ofira Ayalon holds a B.Sc. in Food Engineering and her Ph.D. deals with waste management. All her academic titles were given by the Technion- Israel Institute of Technology. Her current research activity closes the loop of food and waste. She is the director of the Natural Resource and Environmental Research Center and head of the department of the Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management at the University of Haifa. She also heads the Environment Cluster Samuel Neman Institute at the Technion

Abstract:

Food loss occurs all along the supply chain- from post-harvest, through processing and production stages, at the retail sector and in homes. The world’s estimates are between 30-40% losses and the economic, environmental and social outcomes are severe. Not only that resources were invested in producing the food (manpower, energy, water, fertilizers etc.), this lost food will not reach the plate and will contribute to increased pollution if left in the field or discarded in a landfill. The study presented will reveal estimates of food loss in Israel. The study includes analysis of existing data, interviews with experts in the field, and an in depth analysis of food waste produced in households. Our assessments reveal 200,000 tons per year of edible agricultural surpluses, usually destroyed by farmers, or left in the fields for different economic reasons. Only 10,000 tons of fresh fruits and vegetables are saved. In order to minimize the loss of food and production of waste, there is a need to develop clear policies, both in order to reduce agricultural produce surplus and limit produce destruction and optimally utilize the surplus, if formed. Wasted food in households is much more complicated to assess. General waste survey will not reveal the amount of edible food thrown away. A new methodology to assess the avoidable food loss will be introduced in order to better understand and set appropriate policy. Policies should address food security on the one hand and minimizing environmental and economic losses on the other hand.

Gourab Samanta

Odissa University of Agriculture and Technology, India

Title: Safe food production from poultry, Japanese quail and pigs with antibiotic alternative

Time : 14:30 - 15:00

Speaker
Biography:

Gourab Samanta has completed his BVSc and AH from Jabalpur Veterinary University, India. After qualifying ICAR, he is pursuing his MVSc in Poultry Science from Odissa University of Agriculture and Technology. He has published four papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

In view of antibiotic free meat production from broiler chicks, Japanese quail and pigs, antibiotic growth promoter was compared to different organic acid salts (OAS) with or without Yeast Mann Oligosaccharide (MOS). In the first experiment, day old chicks of Japanese Quail (n-250) were randomly assigned into seven dietary treatments: Control (T0) chicks with a standard basal diet; T1-basal diet with antibiotic (Bacitracin Methyl Disalisylate-BMD) at 0.5 gKg­-1; T2-diet with sodium butyrate at 5 gKg-1; diet with MOS 1 gKg-1; diet with ammonium formate at 1 gKg-1, calcium propionate 1 g Kg-1 and sodium butyrate 5 gKg-1; diet with sodium butyrate 5 gKg-1 and MOS at 1 gKg-1; Ammonium formate at 1 gKg-1, calcium propionate at 1 gKg-1, sodium butyrate at 5 gKg-1 and MOS at 1 gKg-1 of the diet. Six weeks feeding trial indicated supplementation of organic acids significantly (P<0.05) increased live weight gain with superior feed conversion. Organic acids also reduces the bacterial load in gut than antibiotic. In the second experiment, broiler chicks were randomly distributed in six groups having four replicates of ten birds in each. The experimental groups were: Control (T0)-provided with standard basal diet; T1-ammonium formate (0.1%) calcium propionate (0.15%), and MOS (0.2%); T2 ammonium formate (0.15%) and calcium propionate (0.15%); T3-ammonium formate (0.1%) calcium propionate (0.1%), calcium lactate (0.1%) and activated charcoal (0.1%); T4-with BMD (0.05%). Six weeks growth study showed that significantly higher (P<0.05) body weight gain and improved feed conversion were observed in the group (T1), supplemented with OAS and MOS combination than antibiotic (T4) and control (T­0) groups respectively. The pathogenic organism count in the gut was reduced with organic acids compared to antibiotic supplementation. In the third experiment, Ghungroo pigs, a local variety were divided in to four experimental groups. Group T0 (control) was provided with standard pig starter and grower diet; group T1-diet with calcium lactate (0.1%), calcium propionate (0.1%) and ammonium formate (0.1%), group T2-with organic acids and Mann oligosaccharide (0.1%) and group T3-with antibiotic supplement aurofac 14 (0.05%) respectively. 90 days feeding trial indicated that there was significantly (P<0.05) superior weight grain and feed efficiency compared to control (T0) and antibiotic supplementation. The microbiological study in feeds and faeces indicated that microbial count like E.coli, coliform and clostridium were significantly (p<0.05) lower with organic acids. From the present findings, it may be inferred that organic acids and mannoligosaccharide may be an alternative of antibiotic for safe food production and controlling of pathogenic microorganism in poultry, Japanese quail and pig production.

Speaker
Biography:

Galiwango Henry is in the final stages of completing his Master’s degree at Makerere University. He finished his first degree in Agriculture Education at Makerere University. He has been a Tutor in School of Education at Makerere and Bugema Universities (both in Uganda). His research area is basically gender, agriculture and food security.

Abstract:

Globally, women greatly contribute to the food-security of their households through their role in growing food-crops and marketing those crops to raise income for purchasing food products, not grown besides being very crucial in ensuring household dietary diversity, by selecting what foods to serve depending on availability. But, their low access to and control over resources in the household reduces their influence over household decisions regarding agricultural production. Little is known as to whether this state affects their ability to ensure food security of their households. The study sought to determine the association between the extent of women’s participation in agriculture decision-making and household food-security in Luwero district, Central Uganda using a descriptive cross sectional survey design on a randomized sample of 135 women from dual-headed farming households in Luwero Sub-county, Luwero district. The women empowerment in agriculture index (WEAI) tool helped to determine the extent of women’s participation as well as the household food insecurity access scale (HFIAS) to determine the food security status of the households. Chi square tests helped determine the association between the extent of women’s participation in agricultural decision-making and household food. Majority of women (62%) had a moderate decision-making position and only 30% had a high decision-making position in agricultural production. However, the Chi-square test conducted revealed a statistically significant association between women’s participation in agriculture decision-making and household food-security (X2=15.230; p=0.004) thus showing the likely contribution of women to food-security if they fully participate in making agricultural decisions. 

Break: 15:30 - 15:45 coffee break @ Foyer

Samuel Udo

Cross River University of Technology, Nigeria

Title: Consumer preference, conservation and sustainability

Time : 15:45 - 16:20

Speaker
Biography:

Samuel Udo has completed his PhD in 2010 from the University of Calabar Nigeria. He studied Plant Pathology and Ethnobotany. Presently, he is the National President of Biopesticides Society of Nigeria. He has published more than 40 papers in reputable journals and is an Assistant Editor in some national journals. His main area of research is Conservation and Food Security.

Abstract:

This research was undertaken to assess the extent of consumers’ preference of some commonly consumed but lesser known leafy vegetables and seeds on conservation of food stuff and their sustainability. The interest was borne out of the fact that only preferred vegetables and seeds are consumed as food in Nigeria and most sub-Saharan African countries and they conserved ex situ by consumers. The research was carried out across the state (Cross River) in south-south Nigeria where the main occupation is farming. Biochemical analysis of the vegetables and seeds was carried out. Questionnaires were administered in selected villages and cities. Community town hall meetings were held for information gathering. Analysis of responses in the questionnaires showed that most (80%) of the vegetable and seeds cultivated, are those that can be purchased by people in the cities and not handed down preference (20%). Some consumers noted that they eat some of the vegetables because of their medicinal content (32%) while (68%) said it was because they need to eat to survive. However, most of these preferred vegetables are herbs and very few are shrubs. From information gathered, there are many vegetables from trees that are consumed by the locals but not cultivated because of lack of market value. Biochemical analysis of the vegetables showed that most of the less preferred vegetables and seeds have excellent nutrient composition, low toxicants and so, can fringe malnutrition triple burden of obesity, undernutrition and low micronutrients. Their cultivation and sustainability will not only help in food security but also protect the environment. Encouraging farmers to grow more of these lesser-known vegetables and seeds through well-developed interest in consumers, is an excellent way of achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) that will reduce hunger and poverty.

Francesca Hansstein

Shanghai University of Finance and Economics, China

Title: Understanding collaborative consumption in emerging economies: The case of Brazil

Time : 16: 20 - 16:55

Speaker
Biography:

Francesca Hansstein is a Research and Assistant Professor at the School of Public Economics and Administration of Shanghai University of Finance and Economics. Before joining SUFE, she has spent one year at West Virginia University (USA) as a Researcher. She earned a PhD in Agrifood Economics and Statistics from the University of Bologna (Italy) and has spent one year at New York University as a visiting PhD student. She has published in academic journals like Journal of Cleaner Production, Global Health Promotion and the American Journal of Health Promotion. She is interested in understanding consumer behavior in relation to food choice and sustainability

Abstract:

Access-based consumption that eschews goods ownership and revolves around giving, exchanging and obtaining goods and services through peer-to-peer networks or usage fees is considered one of the most transformative and scalable trends towards sustainability. These expressions–labeled collaborative or shared consumption, or the sharing economy have the potential to materialize sustainable consumption by redistributing, reusing, repairing and reducing what is to be consumed. Similar to other forms of sustainable consumption theory posits, these practices occur as a result of influences usually absent from standard models of individual ownership of consumer goods such as concerns for the environment, community and a less corporatized and money-dependent economy. However, there has been little empirical research on how citizens engage with shared consumption and what drives their engagement; even more so in developing societies. This paper aims to address these points by modelling consumers’ orientations, intentions and behavior towards collaborative consumption after an extended version of the theory of planned behavior, using a survey of sharing economy practices and motivations in Brazil. Our results reveal that forces behind the potential acceptance of collaborative consumption (e.g., intentions) differ from those who led consumers to action. We also find that individually expected emotional payoffs, the perceived easiness for enacting shared consumption, and its social legitimacy play a far more critical role than values or perceived material rewards.